Projects of the

Saint Paul Parks Conservancy

For more than a century, the City of Saint Paul, along with private donors and community partners, has developed one of the country’s most celebrated park systems. Below are the projects the Saint Paul Parks Conservancy has assisted with funding.

Lilydale Regional Park

Oxford Field

Rice Park Revitalization

Sepak Takraw Courts

Lewis Sports Foundation Partnership

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Thank you Minnesota State Parks and Trails for the beautiful photo and the timely information!Fawns are typically born in early May. These small spotted babies are often left alone during the day while their mother forages for food. During these times, fawns are learning critical survival skills from their mothers.

Please give them their space and do not disturb them.

Remember, if you care, leave them there.

Learn about what to do if you come across orphaned wildlife: go.usa.gov/xHdhr

📷: Maria Schaffer
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Thank you Minnesota State Parks and Trails for the beautiful photo and the timely information!

Thank you Ramsey County Historical Society for sharing the history of Newell Park! It's wonderful to read the comments to see how many lifetime memories have been created there! #lovesaintpaulparksNewell Park is one of the oldest parks in Saint Paul. Located at the junction of Fairview Ave. and Pierce Butler Route, it was founded in 1908. The land that eventually became this historic park was often bought and sold in the late 1800s. William Marshall, who became Minnesota’s fifth governor, bought the land in the 1860s and had it platted out. Its proximity to Hamline University and Hamline Village meant that students enjoyed the park on a regular basis, sometimes using it to court. There was a frog pond and a famous “Proposal Rock,” the locations of both have now been lost. In 1929, the Newell Park Improvement Association built a pavilion in the park, which was recently restored. The park declined after World War II, but is still used and loved by the community.
Photo: A postcard of the Newell Park Frog Pond. Courtesy of Steve Trimble, RCHS History magazine.
For more on Newell Park and its history, see the article by Krista Finstad Hanson at publishing.rchs.com/publishing/magazine/ramsey-county-history-magazine-volume-43-4-winter-2009/
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Thank you Ramsey County Historical Society for sharing the history of Newell Park! Its wonderful to read the comments to see how many lifetime memories have been created there! #lovesaintpaulparks

Great advice for #wellnesswednesday from Saint Paul Parks and Recreation !While you’re outside this week write down a few things that you are grateful for. If it’s gratitude for another person, let them know. If it’s for yourself, make sure you let yourself hear it too.

(Photo taken at Wakan Tipi in Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary. Learn more about this sacred Dakota place at www.lowerphalencreek.org/wakantipicenter)

📷: Russ Stark

#WellnessWednesday #ExploreOutdoorsSaintPaul #MySaintPaulParks #Grateful #Gratitude #SelfLove
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Great advice for #wellnesswednesday from Saint Paul Parks and Recreation !

Today's Monday Park Museum Feature is Queen of the Wandering Races by local artist Craig David in Parque Castillo. The piece represents the mythological mother or queen of the immigrant families living in the West Side of Saint Paul. The different layers represent the vast ethnic diversity of the West Side, from the early Jewish to the present Hispanic community. The steel upright originally served as a tie beam on the old Wabasha Street Bridge.

If this work is a favorite of someone you love, dedicate it to them through our "Adopt a Sculpture" program. #lovesaintpaulparks #saintpaulparkart
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Todays Monday Park Museum Feature is Queen of the Wandering Races by local artist Craig David in Parque Castillo. The piece represents the mythological mother or queen of the immigrant families living in the West Side of Saint Paul.  The different layers represent the vast ethnic diversity of the West Side, from the early Jewish to the present Hispanic community.  The steel upright originally served as a tie beam on the old Wabasha Street Bridge. 

If this work is a favorite of someone you love, dedicate it to them through our Adopt a Sculpture program. #lovesaintpaulparks #saintpaulparkart
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The Saint Paul Parks Conservancy
is a 501(c)(3) organization.

Federal EIN 26-2788415

CONTACT

651-300-7876
office@stpaulparks.org

1611 County Rd B West Ste 315
Saint Paul, MN 55113